Evolution of the Sword-Tip

Here’s is a rather picture heavy post of how the sword-tip belt made by Scott of ‘Don’t Mourn, Organize!’ (a.k.a. Unlucky).

Before I start, here is his blog (since a few people have been asking):

http://dontmournorganize.wordpress.com/

I won’t rant on for too long this time – rather let the photos do the talking.

 

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I have to say that the 15 oz vegetable tanned natural hide that Scott has used for this belt ages very quickly.

I attribute this to the ‘unfinished’ nature of the leather…

It seems like not much processing was done after the tanning process (as inferred by how ‘thirsty’ the leather was when new, and the fact that the hide hasn’t been compacted/settled much.)

Very different from what the Japanese makers would usually utilize for their belts – they tend to use heavily curried and settled leather (read: bridle.)

 

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ImageShack, share photos, pictures, free image hosting, free video hosting, image hosting, video hosting, photo image hosting site, video hosting site

 

The resulting effect of using this very raw leather is an intense darkening of the grain within a relatively short period of time.

This heavily emphasises areas of wear & tear, lending a very rustic look to the belt (as opposed to the more uniform darkening in more finished leathers).

The thickness of the leather used also means that the belt will not distort out of shape, even when attached with heavy ammo-pouches or medicine bags.

Some people have raised doubts about my preference for heavy-duty belts…but if utility is required, thinner belts just don’t function very well.

 

The backside of the leather has also worn in quite nicely (compare with previous posts!)

The excess fibres have been rubbed away, and the surface condensed into a smoother texture.

The edges of the leather have darkened magnificently too, creating a nice frame effect to highlight the patina.

 

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The wax on the threads have somewhat worn off too, but the rivets will keep the buckle secure 🙂

On close-up of the grain, you’ll probably notice that the grain hasn’t expanded out too much compared to the darkening tone.

Perhaps the leather has been buffed quite thoroughly – I really don’t know.

 

Anyway, I’ll be wearing this belt for another month before I store it away until 2012.

The belt for my Roy x Cone contest jeans is arriving very shortly (another from Scott.)

This is by no means the final update though; this belt still has a lot more to give and demands much more wear before it’s true potential is realised.

 

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